The Story of Temple Drake

Hollywood: Paramount Pictures, 1933. Original lobby card for the 1933 pre-Code film, based on William Faulkner's 1931 novel, "Sanctuary."

An interesting image from the film’s final dramatic courtroom scene. The film has a relatively upbeat ending, in which Temple tells the truth and is disgraced. This in marked contrast to the ending of Faulkner’s novel, in which Temple perjures herself in court, retaining her dignity but resulting in the lynching of an innocent man.

Based on William Faulkner’s 1931 controversial literary potboiler, "Sanctuary." The story concerns a wealthy and neurotic Southern belle who falls in with a violent bootlegger who rapes her and forces her into prostitution. Every bit as controversial as the source material, the film’s depiction of the assault was graphic and shocking even among films of the era, and, along with the same year’s equally sensational "Baby Face," was directly responsible for the stricter enforcement of the Production Code beginning the next year, bringing the pre-Code era to a close.

George Raft, then under contract to Paramount, was assigned the role of the bootlegger, but found the part repulsive and went to battle with the studio in a suit that nearly cost him his career.

Unavailable for decades outside of 16mm bootlegs, the film was restored by the Museum of Modern Art in 2011 and screened at the TCM Classic Film Festival, but still awaits a commercial release.

11 x 14 inches, Near Fine, with a holograph graphite notation to the verso.


[Book #141215]

Price: $750.00